Steeped in Story

Here’s what’s been entertaining me lately:

king dark tower

The past few months have seen me steeped in Stephen King’s epic Dark Tower series. It’s the tale of Roland of Gilead, a gunslinger in a world that’s moved on, in search of the Dark Tower, the center of all worlds.

I haven’t read a series in a long time, since my fantasy days in my twenties with Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time, or George R.R. Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire in my thirties, neither of which I finished, mostly because I got bored waiting around for the next book. By the time I got to this one, it was complete, and I could download the next one on my Kindle right away.

What I love about this series, besides King’s obvious storytelling skills, is that it covers a range of genres: fantasy, science fiction, horror, western. It’s got it all. In lesser hands, that blending would only create a big mess, but here it’s simply wonderful.

intolerably stupid

I’m also reading Northanger Abbey, by Jane Austen. My library is putting on a Jane Austen book discussion over the coming year, and though I’ve done this before several years ago, I’m eagerly coming aboard this time, too. Austen’s books are those that beg to be reread an indefinite number of times over one’s lifetime, and you carry something different away from them each and every time. Northanger Abbey is my least favorite, but that doesn’t mean I don’t like it. It will be followed by Sense & Sensibility, Pride & Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion. I’m planning on writing a review for the blog as I finish each book.

As for TV, I’ve been casting around for a new show to watch for some time now. I began watching the new season of X-files in January, but only got through the first two shows before giving up in disgust. I couldn’t keep up with the lightning-speed, rat-a-tat-tat scenes and felt plunged into confusion as I tried to remember what happened in the series twenty years ago. No thanks.

alienist

Fortunately, I found The Alienist, on TNT. This series is based on a book by Caleb Carr I read just as long ago, mid-nineties or so. It takes place in 1896 New York, where Dr. Laszlo Kreizler is an “alienist”,  a precursor to what we now call a psychologist or psychiatrist. At the time, those who studied the mentally ill considered them to be alienated from their true natures, hence the name. Pyschology was just beginning to emerge as a science at this time, but there were still plenty of people who dismissed the idea as quackery.

Dr. Laszlo Kreizler (Daniel Bruhl) uses his knowledge of human nature to solve criminal cases, and here he is on the trail of a serial killer who murders and mutilates boy prostitutes. He has help in the form of his illustrator friend John Moore (Luke Evans) and Sara Howland (Dakota Fanning), the first woman to work in the New York police department, and secretary to Commissioner Teddy Roosevelt.

This show is dark, creepy, and gruesome–right up my alley.  The characters are complex and intriguing. Kreizler is soft-spoken and analytical, some might say callous, but underneath his calm, unruffled demeanor is a passionate man with a heart. John Moore is your typical Victorian gentleman who is going to have quite a few of his assumptions cut to ribbons. Sarah, underneath her cold exterior, is an ambitious woman trying to succeed in a man’s world. And Roosevelt has his work cut out for him cleaning up the corruption in the NY police department, whose officers routinely take bribes from the Mob. All have painful pasts and hidden struggles.

The backdrop of the city scales the lush, glittering heights of the very rich, down to the horrific underbelly of the very poor, mostly immigrant communities. I’m mesmerized by every aspect of the show, from the setting to the storyline to the relationships between the characters; but especially by Laszlo’s obsessive investigation into the heart of a human monster. Bravo.

 

 

 

 

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